Holiday Cottages in Carmarthenshire

 

The spectacular county of Carmarthenshire is situated on the south coast of Wales with Swansea to the south, Powys to the east, Ceredigion to the north and Pembrokeshire to the west. Carmarthenshire has so much to offer the discerning visitor, with lush fertile countryside and a splendid coastline with long sandy beaches. Wales has a plethora of castles, historic attractions and heritage sites and Carmarthenshire is certainly no exception with Carmarthen Castle, Carreg Cennen Castle, Laugharne Castle, Dinefwr, Dryslwyn Castle, all and more awaiting your visit.

Tywi Valley from Dryslwyn Castle

Carmarthenshire is a coastal county in South West Wales, consisting of the plain of the Towy and its surrounding hill lands. The river valley itself crosses the county in a gentle curve, running first of all from north-east to south-west, and then, between Llandeilo and Carmarthen, almost east to west. The river at the latter point turns sharply south-south-west to the sea, but the lowland area of the middle Towy is continued west-south-west of Carmarthen town towards St. Clears and the middle Taf valley. The line of lowland is a much-eroded anticline, which is composed mainly of lower Palaeozoic rocks: sandstones, shales, and conglomerates. The general trend seems to suggest folding in Caledonian times, while the whole scheme is parallel to that of the Teifi valley to the westward and ultimately to the general direction of the southern half of Cardigan Bay. To the north of this lowland, the high ground is formed of Ordo-Vician and Silurian shales and mudstones, and may be said to form two roughly-parallel ridges, separated from each other by a lowland divide, which follows the upper Cothi valley as far as Brechfa, and then passes through Llanllawddog, Llanpumsaint, Cynwyl Elfed, and Trelech a’r Betws. These upland ridges are south-westward extensions of the great mountain massif of Central Wales, which culminates in Plinlimon Fawr (2,468 feet), far to the north of the county border. The long extended fingers of this massif stretch through Carmarthenshire into the Preseli Mountains of Pembrokeshire on the west . In their Carmarthenshire sections, both highland belts decrease in height from the north-east, the northern upland being broader than the southern.

Aerial View Carreg Cennen

You don’t have to look far to discover why more and more visitors are visiting Carmarthenshire, the Garden of Wales. It has world-class gardens and greener-than-green countryside. There’s an idyllic coastline – until recently a well-kept secret – of large beaches and beautiful estuaries.Carmarthenshire has many wonderful attractions for all people to enjoy. From its glorious beaches, stretches of greenery to its historic castle and ruins. Visit the Garden of Wales from the National Botanic Gardens to Aberglasney to heritage sites such as Dolaucothi Goldmines and Dinefwr Park. Don’t just read about them – do it, plan a visit now!enshire is a coastal county in South West Wales, consisting of the plain of the Towy and its surrounding hill lands. The river valley itself crosses the county in a gentle curve, running first of all from north-east to south-west, and then, between Llandeilo and Carmarthen, almost east to west. The river at the latter point turns sharply south-south-west to the sea, but the lowland area of the middle Towy is continued west-south-west of Carmarthen town towards St. Clears and the middle Taf valley. The line of lowland is a much-eroded anticline, which is composed mainly of lower Palaeozoic rocks: sandstones, shales, and conglomerates. The general trend seems to suggest folding in Caledonian times, while the whole scheme is parallel to that of the Teifi valley to the westward and ultimately to the general direction of the southern half of Cardigan Bay. To the north of this lowland, the high ground is formed of Ordo-Vician and Silurian shales and mudstones, and may be said to form two roughly-parallel ridges, separated from each other by a lowland divide, which follows the upper Cothi valley as far as Brechfa, and then passes through Llanllawddog, Llanpumsaint, Cynwyl Elfed, and Trelech a’r Betws. These upland ridges are south-westward extensions of the great mountain massif of Central Wales, which culminates in Plinlimon Fawr (2,468 feet), far to the north of the county border. The long extended fingers of this massif stretch through Carmarthenshire into the Preseli Mountains of Pembrokeshire on the west . In their Carmarthenshire sections, both highland belts decrease in height from the north-east, the northern upland being broader than the southern.

Llansteffan

Any trip to Carmarthenshire would not be complete without a trip The National Botanic Garden of Wales – the first national botanic garden created in the new millennium and opened by HRH The Prince of Wales. The Great Glasshouse with the largest single span glasshouse in the world is a wonder to behold and for that reason is on a shortlist for ‘The Seven Wonders of Wales’. There are 150 acres of gardens including Garden Lakes, a Japanese Garden, Organic Farm, Woods of the World, Plant Sales, Apothecaries Garden, Science Centre and, quite frankly, a list far too long to mention but an absolute must to view upon your visit to Carmarthenshire.
Compact Carmarthen bay packs a mighty big punch. Home to an amazing variety of seashores from the biggest beaches to beautiful estuaries including the new Millenium Coastal Park near Pembrey. Enjoy the wonderful views around Carmarthenshire by taking either an authentic steam train ride on the Gwili Railway or hop aboard the Sospan Hopper at the Millennium Coastal Park! Visit the county’s most celebrated legacies – its castles. There are seven castles to visit with Carreg Cennen standing head and shoulders above them all. Visit Cenarth Falls where you can still see coracles in action…..

Burry Port

Natural beauty at its best, visit the unique Welsh gold mines amid the wooded hillsides, this gold is always used for royal wedding rings, Dinefwr Park in all its glory with its medieval deer park, historic Newton House and Dinefwr Castle, or walk up the nature trails to the site of the Iron Age on Merlin’s Hill. Experience it all in Carmarthenshire. Enjoy the art and craft work of local artists. Work is available to view on display or purchase as a souvenir of your Carmarthenshire holiday. Carmarthenshire has many wonderful attractions for all people to enjoy. From its glorious beaches, stretches of greenery to its historic castle and ruins. Visit the Garden of Wales from the National Botanic Gardens to Aberglasney to heritage sites such as Dolaucothi Goldmines and Dinefwr Park. Don’t just read about them – do it, plan a visit now!

All images © Crown copyright (2007) Visit Wales